Archives for posts with tag: Museums

This is Beth. Celebrating.

Exhibit opening 2012:

November last

(That’s me on the left.)

Exhibit opening 2013:

November this

(That’s Liz on the right, me next to her sporting a spiky version of this month’s do.)

What strikes me (besides dramatic do change): how fortunate I am to work on projects like these, with fabulous people.

This is Beth. Last year, after we started blogging but before we started cutting, I posted about what I was willing to do with my do. At that time I said no Kate (from Jon and Kate Plus Eight), yes Katy (Katy Perry blue bob, or any Katy Perry really).

I also drafted a post way back then when I met  a woman whose do so moved me that I asked her if I could photo it. Kate agreed to the pic, and offered without prompting to send her inspiration/haircutter instruction image and did so immediately. She followed up with even more visual material. I like this woman. And her hair. I like everything about this story.

Kate at work:

Kate2 Kate1

Kate’s inspiration pic:

Kate3

Past pics of Kate and more inspiration:

Kate 1

Kate 2

Kate 3

Kate 4

I hadn’t looked at the pictures in months. Now I realize that I’ve gotten pretty close to her do. Though it looks better on Kate, and she didn’t need a hair/blog project as impetus!

This is Beth. Revisiting some early thoughts. From December 2012 (please note, the exhibit mentioned at the end opens this week):

I love Denver. I love love living where I live. I have a humongous (possibly out of proportion) sense of pride having been born in Denver.

The connection I have to my city – and, well, the whole damn state of Colorado – has nothing to do with my do. Or does it?

Liz and I are both from Denver. That means we came into the world and spent our child-through-young-adult-hoods (until college for both of us) in a very dry climate. We both, by the way, have naturally curly hair. For that reason, we’re kinda lucky to live in a low-humidity environment. Others feel the same way. Check out Reason to Love Denver #22 by Lindsey B. Koehler in 5280 December 2012. (to get directly to #22 click to page 4, though I recommend reading other rockin’ reasons as well).

But, don’t move to Colorado. While in many ways we’re happy to share the dry air with frizzy-haired friends, we’re already sharing with more folks than ever before. We’re dealing with problems of too many people, particularly in Our Mountains. The impacts go way way beyond hair. As Colorado becomes increasingly hotter and drier, what choices will we make?

It’s not too early to plan a visit to the History Colorado Center to explore real (way beyond hair) climate-related issues. Living West opens November 23, 2013. And meanwhile, tour the exhibits already on display – including Denver A to Z, a love letter to my city. And, hell, go on up to Our Mountains, I hear the snow’s great. (Well…)

*THANKS to Michelle for sending link to article. Thank you HCC for allowing us to think about the health of our state in way-more-important-than-hair ways; and to SMM, Jeff Hayward, and Janet Kamien for helping us do it.

This is Beth. It was a happy accident – Liz says fate – that we ended up with Orange and Blue January dos.

We’re both Denver natives, born to support the Broncos.

Bronco hair

D is for Devoted! At the Denver A to Z exhibit at the History Colorado Center (Be the Barrel Man).

This is Beth. When I tell people about this little hair/blog project, they often have their own do-related tale to tell. It often has something to do with how their hair has something to do with their identity.

Liz and I both work at museums; we recently saw this in an exhibit in Minnesota:

MN Hist

The label: “To many American Indians like the Dakota, long hair is culturally significant. By forcing children to have their hair cut, boarding schools were destroying a piece of the student’s identity.”

The reference to an enormously tragic part of history brought a few things to mind:

  • We’re lucky to pretty much control our own hair.
  • We should have control over the rest of our bodies too (I’m a big fan of women’s reproductive rights and can’t help but think of recent political debate).
  • How much of our identity has to do with our hair?
  • Sign, sign, everywhere a sign http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gklM1AiZX0s

This is Beth. I love Denver. I love love living where I live. I have a humongous (possibly out of proportion) sense of pride having been born in Denver.

The connection I have to my city – and, well, the whole damn state of Colorado – has nothing to do with my do. Or does it?

Liz and I are both from Denver. That means we came into the world and spent our child-through-young-adult-hoods (until college for both of us) in a very dry climate. We both, by the way, have naturally curly hair.

As a youngster I recall having hair-related issues while traveling. Eventually, on this very blog, you may see evidence of humidity-induced bad hair days from around the country and world. Don’t hold your breadth, those pics have to be physically removed from photo albums and scanned. It’s not that I’m ashamed of how crazy my do looked on those trips though. Actually, again, I’m proud. And others feel the same way. Check out Reason to Love Denver #22 by Lindsey B. Koehler in 5280 December 2012: http://www.5280.com/magazine/2012/12/reasons-love-denver (to get directly to #22 click to page 4, though I recommend reading other rockin’ reasons as well).

But, don’t move to Colorado. While in many ways we’re happy to share the dry air with frizzy-haired friends, we’re already sharing with more folks than ever before. Already we’re dealing with problems of too many people, particularly in Our Mountains. The impacts go way way beyond hair. As Colorado becomes increasingly hotter and drier, what choices will we make?

It’s not too early to plan a visit to the History Colorado Center to explore real (way beyond hair) climate-related issues. Living West opens November 2013. And meanwhile, tour the exhibits already on display – including Denver A to Z, a love letter to my city. And, hell, go on up to Our Mountains, I hear the snow’s great. (Well…)

*THANKS to Michelle Jeske for sending link to article. Thank you to HCC for allowing us to think about the health of our state in way-more-important-than-hair ways; and to SMM, Jeff Hayward, and Janet Kamien for helping us do it.

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